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Who Are We?

We represent a group of high-skilled Green Card applicants mostly from Green Card backlogged countries such as India with at least a decade of individual professional experience and expertise in sectors such as Engineering, Science, Medical, Information Technology and more. Many of us hold master’s degrees and/or doctorate degrees from prestigious US universities, have published number of academic papers at international level and/or have professional certifications in our respective areas of expertise. We were hired purely based on our skills, experience and qualifications. All of us have been employed legally and have been living in US legally since decades. We’ve collectively made tremendous contributions in US economy while working for US based firms and by buying houses, investing in 401k, retirement funds, paying all the taxes regularly and following all the rules.                                                                                                              

Our Primary Issue

On one hand where from time to time, our contributions to US economy have been highlighted and attested by various research studies done by most prestigious and highly recognized US universities and institutes, the Green Card allocation to us high-skilled applicants have been extremely unfair and discriminatory. The current immigration system puts us in a cruel “nation-of-birth” based quota system which applies an arbitrary cap of 7% to employment-based Green Cards issued to every country irrespective of its size or number of skilled applicants comes from these countries. This results in pushing Green Card wait period for high-skilled applicants from India to anywhere from 15 years to 70 years but high-skilled applicant from any other country (say from countries such as Egypt, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Peru, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Syria or UK) can get their Green Card within 1- 2 years after entering United States. It is extremely discriminatory and unfair where we are hired based on our skills but Green Cards are allocated to us based on country of our birth.

How Can you Help?

SIIA has actively been monitoring and promoting various bills and legislative actions that can help clear the backlogs and provide necessary relief to highly- skilled immigrants in USA. You are here because you are either a subscriber, volunteer, sympathizer, and/or one of the skilled immigrants facing setbacks. We request our you to actively contribute to our campaigns and help take a step forward to fix the broken immigration system. Helping highly-skilled immigrants is truly helping the American economy.

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Proposed Solution to Resolve Green Card Backlog Issue

HR392 – S281

HR392 is a bipartisian bill that enjoys wide support from both the major parties. It currently has 200+ cosponsors. The bill aims to elimiate the per country caps in green card allocations to skilled immigrants. This is in line with the emphasis of our President on skilled immigration. S281 is the senate version of the bill HR392.

Summary for the bill :: Fairness for High-Skilled Immigrants Act of 2017 – HR392

Amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to: (1) eliminate the per country numerical limitation for employment-based immigrants, and (2) increase the per country numerical limitation for family based immigrants from 7% to 15% of the total number of family-sponsored visas.

Amends the Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 to eliminate the provision requiring the reduction of annual Chinese immigrant visas to offset status adjustments under such Act.

Sets forth the following transition period for employment-based second and third preference (EB-2 and EB-3) immigrant visas:

  • for FY2015, 15% of such visas allotted to natives of countries other than the two countries with the largest aggregate numbers of natives obtaining such visas in FY2011;
  • for FY2016, 10% of such visas allotted in each category to natives of countries other than the two with the largest aggregate numbers of natives obtaining such visas in FY2012; and
  • for FY2017, 10% of such visas allotted in each category to natives of countries other than the two with the largest aggregate numbers of natives obtaining such visas in FY2015.

Sets forth the following per country distribution rules: (1) for transition period visas, not more than 25% of the total number of EB-2 and EB-3 visas for natives of a single country; and (2) for non-transition period visas, not more than 85% of EB-2 and EB-3 visas for natives of a single country.

Provides that the amendments made by this Act will take place as if enacted on September 30, 2014, and shall apply beginning in FY2017.